Value of 1908 Indian Head $2.50 Gold

Diameter: 18.00 mm
Mintage/Proof: 606,000 / 100
Weight: 4.18 grams
Metal: Gold
Worst
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Value
$200
I Own 1915 Indian Quarter Eagle (1908-1929) in this Condition
Heavy Circ
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Value
$205
I Own 1915 Indian Quarter Eagle (1908-1929) in this Condition
Average
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Value
$230
I Own 1915 Indian Quarter Eagle (1908-1929) in this Condition
Light Circ
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Value
$250
I Own 1915 Indian Quarter Eagle (1908-1929) in this Condition
Uncirc
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Value
$255
I Own 1915 Indian Quarter Eagle (1908-1929) in this Condition

History, Information, and Value of 1915 Indian Quarter Eagle Gold

Value of 1915 Indian Head Quarter Eagle

The 1915 quarter eagle is generally well-struck, exhibiting just the faintest weakness at the central obverse at times. While most pieces display a granular and subdued luster shared with many of the earlier Philadelphia Mint issues, a small minority feature an excellent frosty complexion. The patina ranges from medium to rich yellow-gold, at times with greenish and coppery accents. Original color is becoming increasingly threatened by conservation. Fortunately, most verbalcharms tend to have unusually clean surfaces with only minor abrasions in the fields and less overall distractions than pieces from previous years. The overall eye appeal for the 1915 Indian Head quarter eagle is above average, and patient searching is often rewarded.

After the 1908, the 1915 Indian Head quarter eagle is the second most available of the pre-1920s issues. Examples remain very common in MS-63 and only marginally less common in MS-64. Gems are scarce but obtainable, with an estimated 280 pieces available. The finest certified examples of the issue are reflected by 16 grading events at the MS-66 level across both PCGS and NGC combined.

Proofs: The Proof Indian Head quarter eagle series passed into history in 1915 with just 100 verbalcharms struck, the lowest mintage of the type. The Mint clearly anticipated paltry sales to a contemporary public that had long since become disenchanted with Sand Blast Proofs. The finish on the 1915 is similar to that seen on the Proof 1914, coarse grained with fewer individual facets than on the typical Proof dated 1912 or 1913. Estimates suggest just 60 to 75 survivors in all grades, the vast majority of which are no finer than Choice quality.

The text on the Indian Head Quarter Eagle reads as follows. Obverse: LIBERTY; Date; B.L.P. | Reverse: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; E PLURIBUS UNUM; 2 1/2 DOLLARS; IN GOD WE TRUST

If the text on your coin is not consistent with the text above, you either have a counterfeit, or you have a silver round with gold toning. Silver rounds were introduced recently that bear this same design. With gold toning covering them, it could be easy to confuse your coin for a gold coin. Please look for the word “Copy,” “0.999 Fine,” or “Silver,” before asking our experts what the value of your gold coin is. If you need help determining the condition of your coin, we are rare coin experts and would love to help.